Stelle: PhD Scholarships in Performance in the Studio and the Psychoacoustics of Mixing and Record Production (London College of Music)

PhD Scholarships in Performance in the Studio and the Psychoacoustics of Mixing and Record Production
London College of Music / University of West London Graduate Scholarships
Application deadline: Sunday 30 June 2013

The University is appointing a number of Graduate Scholars and applications are invited by the London College of Music in either of the following two areas of specialism:

1. Performance in the Studio

Research Context
This project reflects the London College of Music’s (LCM) international reputation in the emerging research field of record production and the perception of recorded music. LCM combines cutting edge research with enormous experience of professional practice in this area and is also working in conjunction with the School of Computing and Technology on using case-based reasoning in the field of applied audio engineering.

Dr. Simon Zagorski-Thomas was recently awarded a visiting fellowship at Cambridge University and was principal investigator on an AHRC funded research network on Performance in the Studio. He is currently working with a team of international researchers on the outputs from those projects and on a proposal for follow-on funding to develop the research further and to organise further impact events.

This project would sit, along with other research into recorded music, plus two AHRC bids in development and the proposed networking event on mixing recorded music, within the remit of the new Institute for Creative Industries when it is launched.

Research Goal
The research activity will explore the concept of distributed creativity through a particular focus on Actor-Network Theory, the Social Construction of Technology and the systems approach to creativity. It will include the analysis of detailed case studies of recording sessions.

Candidate Profile
The ideal candidate should have an MA / MSc or equivalent degree in a relevant area of music performance or production. The candidate will combine experience of organising recording sessions (either as a performer or technician) with theoretical knowledge of performance studies and/or the social construction of technology.

The candidate would engage in the analysis of one or more recording sessions in the studios of LCM or elsewhere. This would involve, organising, filming and otherwise fully documenting these recording sessions and undertaking a structured analysis of both the interactions in the sessions themselves and any subsequent interviews and commentaries.

Knowledge / experience of qualitative questionnaire techniques and the statistical analysis of results would be a useful, though not essential skill.

2. The Psychoacoustics of Mixing and Record Production

Research Context
This project reflects the London College of Music’s (LCM) international reputation in the emerging research field of record production and the perception of recorded music. LCM combines cutting edge research with enormous experience of professional practice in this area and is also working in conjunction with the School of Computing and Technology on using case-based reasoning in the field of applied audio engineering.

Dr. Simon Zagorski-Thomas and Dr. Andrew Bourbon are developing research in this area which would inform the theoretical framework about the perception and cognition of recorded music used in this PhD project. The outcomes of
this project would also provide further theoretical input for the School of Computing and Technology’s project on „Experience-based audio mastering and mixing“. The extensive experience of mixing and recording that other members of the LCM have would also feed into these projects.

This project would sit, along with other research into recorded music, plus
two AHRC bids in development and the proposed networking event on mixing recorded music, within the remit of the new Institute for Creative Industries when it is launched.

Research Goal
The research activity will aim to examine the way that specific techniques used in mixing recorded music (dynamic compression, frequency equalisation and filtering and spatial processing) affect its perception and can be used
in its production.

Candidate Profile
The ideal candidate should have an MA / MSc or equivalent degree in the psychology of music, music technology or music production. The candidate will combine strong practical skills in mixing recorded music with a theoretical knowledge of music perception and cognition.

The candidate would work in conjunction with a number of staff in the music department whose research and professional practice is in the area of record production and mixing recorded music. The candidate will carry out applied research work that will involve listener and user studies to test hypotheses resulting from the proposed theoretical framework.

Knowledge / experience of qualitative questionnaire techniques and the statistical analysis of results would be a useful, though not essential skill.

Further Information

The Graduate Scholars will register as full-time MPhil/PhD students in one of the above strategic priority areas and will teach up to six hours per week (seminars, tutorials, marking and assisting in monitoring the academic progress of students).

The Scholarship will offer:

  • MPhil/PhD fee waiver at the home/EU rate;
  • Tax-free stipend of £ 37000 per annum;
  • Support, subject to satisfactory performance and academic progress, for three years.

For further information about the Graduate Scholarships, please email simon.zagorski-thomas@uwl.ac.uk (copying in researchdegrees@uwl.ac.uk) indicating the area in which you are interested. You will then be sent details of the specific projects available including the entry criteria for each project and details of the application process.

Last date for enquiries: Friday 21 June 2013

Closing date for applications: Sunday 30 June 2013

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